Lady T-Wolves Take Down Windsor/Stew-Stras 10-0

Photo by Keith Stewart Windsor/Stew-Stras' Kendall Knop makes the tag-out at second on Okaw Valley's Paige Robinson Thursday evening.

Photo by Keith Stewart
Windsor/Stew-Stras' Kendall Knop makes the tag-out at second on Okaw Valley's Paige Robinson Thursday evening.

After a week of cancelled games, OV stays hungry

March 27, 2015
by Keith Stewart
keith@newsprogress.com
It may have been a blustery, cold evening in Windsor Thursday, but it only gave reason for third baseman Kayla Wheeler to bust a few dance moves in between Amanda McClain’s solid seventh inning pitches. Just a half inning before, Wheeler’s slap play helped senior Paige Harlin get to third base, and from there, Harlin tempted Windsor/Stew-Stras’ catcher to try and throw her out on each of the following pitches, advancing 10 or so feet down the line before finally walking back to the bag, smile streaked across her face. On the fourth, a wild ball low got away from Bayleigh Tabor, and the cheeky senior did more than threaten as she ran for the plate to score OV’s final run in their 10-0 victory over the Comets.
And Thursday’s victory resembled that of their season opener against Paris a week ago Wednesday, which also marked the last time the team played thanks to periodic rains canceling three games in between.
As in their 7-2 win over Paris, OV once again did most of their offensive damage in the first two innings, though this time it amounted to seven runs.
With one out in the first, Paige Robinson got things going with a walk. Senior Amy Orris then struck out, but Harlin then laced a single to left field to put runners at first and second. Freshman Natalie Jeffers drove the two in with a triple to the left center gap. Wheeler followed with a single to left to score Jeffers, and then Jessica Robinson made it a fourth consecutive hit with an RBI triple down the third base line to put OV up 4-0. Read More

Sages Steal Victory from Knights with Seventh Inning Rally

Back-to-back bunts overturn ALAH victory

March 26, 2015

By Matt Kracht
NP Sports Reporter

Coming off a big win over rival Tuscola the ALAH Knights were a half inning away from staying perfect on the season with a 1-0 victory over Monticello Tuesday. Unfortunately the baseball gods had other ideas.
Tyler Schuring who pitched six innings of shutout baseball deserved a better outcome as back-to-back sacrifice bunts by the Sages in the top of the seventh turned into hits bringing home Monticello’s first run of the contest. The Sages would add another tally in the inning on a sac fly to take a 2-1 lead and were able to hold on for the comeback win.
Nonetheless, Arthur head coach Craig Moffet thought the defense played well, and that Schuring was on top of his game.
“The defense was good today. I think the guys did a good job backing each other up,” he said. “They were really engaged and ready to play.” Read More

Sullivan Native Wins $21,500 On “Jeopardy!”!

Photo Courtesy of Jeopardy Productions, Inc. Pictured is “Jeopardy!” game show host Alex Trebek with Sullivan native Rachael Sims during an episode that aired March 6.

Photo Courtesy of Jeopardy Productions, Inc.
Pictured is “Jeopardy!” game show host Alex Trebek with Sullivan native Rachael Sims during an episode that aired March 6.

Sims appeared on popular game show earlier this month

March 25, 2015

by Ariana Cherry
Arthur/Sullivan Reporter

Not only does knowledge equal power, but it also can help you earn some extra money for your bank account. That is what Sullivan native and recent law school graduate Rachael Sims found out after competing on the famous ““Jeopardy!”!” game show.
“I won $21,500 in my first game, which was very exciting!” said Sims. “Unfortunately, I didn’t win my second game, but I did get to earn $1,000 for my third place finish. Of course, all of these totals are before taxes!
While the show was aired March 6, it actually had been filmed in January. And the journey to participating on ““Jeopardy!”!” actually started online.
“Everyone who wants to appear as a contestant on “Jeopardy!” has to take an online test,” said Sims. “The test is offered once per year and consists of 50 questions. You’re given eight seconds to answer each question, and you don’t have to phrase your answers in the form of a question. It’s basically just a general knowledge test to see if you know enough about a variety of different categories to be competitive on the show. You don’t get your results for the online test, but if you score high enough, you might be contacted for an interview.” Read More

Strong Individual Performances for SOV and ALAH

Photo by Keith Stewart ALAH junior Jakob Brewer rounds the final turn of the 4x200 relay, which finished 22nd. Brewer also competed in the 60m hurdles, in which he placed sixth with a time of 9.31 seconds.

Photo by Keith Stewart
ALAH junior Jakob Brewer rounds the final turn of the 4x200 relay, which finished 22nd. Brewer also competed in the 60m hurdles, in which he placed sixth with a time of 9.31 seconds.

Yeakley takes fourth, Uphoff earns fifth

March 25, 2015

by Keith Stewart
keith@newsprogress.com

Neither the SOV or Arthur-Lovington/Atwood-Hammond boys’ track and field teams placed in the top half of last weekend’s Charleston Indoor Invitational at Eastern Illinois University. Out of 33 class A schools, the Redskins finished 29th while the Knights took 23rd. But that didn’t mean each wouldn’t covet a few top performances.
Junior Colton Yeakley led the immediate area taking fourth place in the shot put with a throw of 47 feet, 11 inches.
“Colton had a personal best in shot put with that throw, and there was solid competition at that meet,” said head coach Ryan Whelan. “It’s good to see his development in shot put (he threw 42 something at the same meet last year). It gives credit to the time and effort he puts in throughout the year with his throwing. It will be good to see what he starts off with throwing discus on Tuesday, since that’s been his 'better' event the last two years.” Read More

Health Screenings April 16 in Sullivan

March 25, 2015

SBL Lincolnland Home Care and Lincolnland Hospice will conduct a free blood pressure clinic from 8:30 to 9 a.m. on Thursday, April 16 at the Senior Center, Sullivan. For more information, call Lincolnland Home Care at 1-800-879-3212.
SBL Lincolnland Home Care, Lincolnland Hospice and Lincolnland Home Medical will sponsor bingo from 9 – 10 a.m. following the blood pressure clinic.
Please note: If the schools are closed due to adverse weather, the senior center will also be closed.

Annual Easter Drama at Smyser Church April 3, 4

March 25, 2015

The high school students of Smyser Christian Church will perform their 16th annual Easter drama at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, April 3 and 4.
More than 55 area high school students will present “This Changes Everything” an Easter message of hope through dramatic skits, creative expressions, and worship. Refreshments will be served following the performance. Read More

A Big Night in the Valley for OV’s FFA Chapter

Submitted Pictured are members of the Okaw Valley FFA organization.

Submitted
Pictured are members of the Okaw Valley FFA organization.

Submitted

March 25, 2015
The Okaw Valley FFA Chapter recently celebrated accomplishments from the past year honoring and awarding more than a dozen of its FFA students.
State FFA president Cody Morris, a guest speaker for the event, touched on the value of FFA in a member’s high school career.
“Attendance to the event was probably the highest this community has ever seen with more than 275 people who attended the event. The kids worked hard to display just how driven they were this past year to succeed in numerous FFA events,” said Okaw Valley FFA advisor Aspen Cassady. Read More

Lovington Library Silent Auction and Bingo

March 25, 2015

The Lovington Public Library is again holding a “Spring Silent Auction” that will start on Monday March 23 at 10 a.m. thru Thursday April 2 at 1 p.m. Patrons that come into the library may put down a bid for any or all of the nine baked items that will be displayed by a picture at this time. The patron that writes down the top bid by Thursday April 2 at 1 p.m. will be called that same afternoon and may then pick the baked item up on Saturday April 4 from 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
All monies raised by the silent auction will be put toward summer program activities.
Another event that the library will host is a free blood pressure check on Friday March 27.
The Moultrie County Health Department will be providing the checks from 12:45-1:15 for anyone who would like to stop by the library. Those attending are also encouraged to bring a white elephant prize and play Bingo from 1-3 p.m. For more information call the Lovington Library at 873-4468.

Understanding Illinois: The Opportunity Costs of Health Care

NowlanMarch 25, 2015

By Jim Nowlan
Outside Columnist

When I was a boy in the 1950s, health care was simple. If you got sick, you went to the family doctor. If you were really sick, you went to the local hospital and stayed until you got better or died. If you could afford it, you might go to Mayo’s for the latest in care. Most costs came out of a family’s pocketbook.
Today, especially as one ages, health care involves a cavalcade of trips to specialists, hands full of daily pills and robotic-driven surgeries to exorcise diseased growths. As relatively little of the costs now come directly out of our pockets, we insist on the latest and best care and technologies, and right away.
As a result, health care costs have gone through the roof and are expected to keep climbing.
According to the Center for American Progress, health care spending in the U.S., adjusted for inflation, increased by 818 percent between 1960 and 2010 while wages were going up just 16 percent. Per capita spending on health care is about $8,000 per year.
Economist William Baumol contends that we can afford the high costs of health care because of productivity increases elsewhere that bring the costs of other goods and services down. Read More

The Romance of Railroading: Folklore Continued

GintherMarch 25, 2015

by Jerry Ginther
NP Columnist

As stated in my first article, the conductor is the boss.
Every member of the train and engine crew is subordinate to him, and the engine crew is under the direction of the brakemen/trainmen. The engineer is strictly a power operator and moves the train only when instructed to do so by a trainman or the conductor. The fireman, when they were used, was under the supervision of the engineman. Post steam engine era the fireman’s position was used to train future engineers or fulfill a union contract.
When the train picked up or set out cars at stations along the line, the conductor handled the business end of each transaction with the station agent. This business mostly amounted to the exchange of the waybills for cars left and those added to his train. A waybill contains a description of the car’s lading, weight, and destination and one must accompany each car in the train’s consist. It also contains the name of the shipper, point of origin, and the consignee. The conductor is responsible to know the total number of cars, whether they are loaded or empty and the total tonnage of his train. This information had to be provided by the conductor to agents or telegraph operators at predetermined stations along the line. Those operators would telegraph that information to the train dispatcher. Without this knowledge, the dispatcher would be unable to plan meeting places between opposing trains. At sidings used for the meeting and passing of trains, one of them would have to fit between the switches of the siding. Read More