Thinking About Health: Help for Hearing Loss Is Often Unaffordable

TrudyLieberman-Photo•July 27, 2016•

By Trudy Lieberman,
Rural Health News Service

Nearly two-thirds of adults over age 70 have hearing loss that doctors consider “clinically meaningful.” In plain English that means as people age, they are likely to become hard of hearing. Many of those people, however, don’t get the help they need, often because they simply cannot afford it.

“The prevalence of hearing loss almost doubles with each age decade of life,” says Dr. Frank Lin, an otolaryngologist at Johns Hopkins University, but for older people, he adds, “there are multiple barriers that prevent individuals from getting their hearing loss addressed.”

Lin spoke about the subject to a group of journalists in a recent phone conference sponsored by a Washington, D.C., advocacy group the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. He is a co-author of a June report issued by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that recommends better access and support for treating hearing loss.

Lin told the group that although hearing loss is a normal part of the aging process, “hearing care is inaccessible” to many seniors. He said studies over the last five years have shown that such loss “can increase the risk of cognitive decline.” Using data from a longitudinal study (one that tracks data from the same people repeatedly over many years or decades) that began in 1958, Lin and his colleagues at Johns Hopkins found that those with hearing loss had a higher probability of developing dementia. The more severe the loss, the more likely the dementia. Read More

Illinois Speed Awareness Day Campaign Reflects on Residential Dangers

•July 27, 2016•

During Illinois Speed Awareness Day this July 27, Troopers from District 10 are taking a proactive approach to promote safety for motorists, pedestrians, and cyclists through both education and enforcement. In Illinois during 2014, speed was the reason for 32.4% of all traffic fatalities. That’s 348 deaths for the year, or one life every 25 hours. These lives can be easily saved by being aware of our speed and understanding how speeding impacts a crash.

District 10 Troopers will be participating in extra enforcement patrols on July 27 including Air Speed, LIDAR Details, and Radar Details. The details will be on state and U.S. Highways, county roads, city streets, and Interstates that run through District 10 including I-57, I-72, and I-74.

In residential areas, speeding can have the following consequences: Read More

Sullivan Annual Cleanup

•July 27, 2016•

In the July 20 News Progress front page story “Sullivan Plans Citywide Cleanup” a mistake on the number of days for cleanup was made.

According to a letter from the Advanced Disposal’s Municipal Waste manager Ed Woker, the Charleston based company would pick up house to house at $1550 per load.

The city would be divided in half with one Saturday set for one part of town and another Saturday scheduled for the remainder.

The article incorrectly indicated this would be done once a month. The citywide cleanup is one time only.

Obituaries 7-27-2016: Mary Davis

Mary Davis

Mary E. Davis, 99, of Sullivan, formerly of Decatur, died Saturday, July 23, 2016 in Mason Point in Sullivan.

Services to celebrate her life were at 1 p.m. today (Wednesday) in Graceland/Fairlawn Funeral Home in Decatur. Burial was in Boiling Springs Cemetery. Read More

Mosquito Reduction Strategy Focuses on Used Tire Threat

•July 27, 2016•

Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Acting Director Alec Messina and Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) Director Nirav D. Shah, M.D., J.D. announced a plan to reduce the threat of mosquito-borne diseases in Illinois such as West Nile virus and Zika virus, by removing used tires from public and abandoned properties.

“Used tires threaten Illinois communities by increasing the risk of disease transmission,” said Illinois EPA Acting Director Alec Messina. “This collaborative effort between IEPA and IDPH will allow us to assist local governments most vulnerable to West Nile virus and the possible spread of Zika virus by removing prime breeding habitats for disease-carrying mosquitoes.” Read More

Central Illinois Airmen Deployed to Mid-East

Photo furnished Deploying Airmen of the 183rd Air Operations Group based in Springfield, Illinois, board a C-130 aircraft on the first leg of their journey to duty in the Middle East. Approximately 80 members of the unit will provide command and control of airpower to Air Forces Central Command and are expected to return home in January 2017. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Shaun Kerr)

Photo furnished
Deploying Airmen of the 183rd Air Operations Group based in Springfield, Illinois, board a C-130 aircraft on the first leg of their journey to duty in the Middle East. Approximately 80 members of the unit will provide command and control of airpower to Air Forces Central Command and are expected to return home in January 2017. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Shaun Kerr)

•July 27, 2016•

Approximately 80 airmen with the 183rd Air Operations Group in Springfield recently deployed to the Middle East.

The airmen will be providing command and control of airpower throughout the Middle East region. Trained to synchronize the efforts of air component operations, the deploying members are specialists in a number of aircraft and systems. They will be responsible for day-to-day execution of combined air and space operations supporting Air Forces Central Command.

Col. John Patterson of Springfield, commander of the 183rd Fighter Wing, referred to the group as, “great Americans,” praising their extensive preparation for this mission. He encouraged them to stay connected with family and friends while deployed and was sure he would be hearing good things about their performance. Read More

Moultrie Moment of the Week

Pictured above is Belle Forest school in Lovington Township 1947-1948. Front row: A.J. Bolsen, Macia Bailey, Wanda Tohill, Lynda West, Helen Keyes Wacaser, teacher. 2nd row: Darrell Taylor, Jack Redfern. 3rd row: Dora York, Glen Woodard, Jordan York, Wanda Ruff. 4th row: Phyllis Tohill, Douglas York & Phyllis Butler. Originals will be saved for return or forwarded to Moultrie County Historical Society. If you have any other information, please contact the Moultrie County Historical Society at 217-728- 4085.. Please submit photos to the News Progress for future consideration. Originals will be saved for return or forwarded to Moultrie County Historical Society. If you have any other information, please contact the Moultrie County Historical Society at 217-728- 4085.

Pictured above is Belle Forest school in Lovington Township 1947-1948. Front row: A.J. Bolsen, Macia Bailey, Wanda Tohill, Lynda West, Helen Keyes Wacaser, teacher. 2nd row: Darrell Taylor, Jack Redfern. 3rd row: Dora York, Glen Woodard, Jordan York, Wanda Ruff. 4th row: Phyllis Tohill, Douglas York & Phyllis Butler. Originals will be saved for return or forwarded to Moultrie County Historical Society. If you have any other information, please contact the Moultrie County Historical Society at 217-728- 4085.. Please submit photos to the News Progress for future consideration. Originals will be saved for return or forwarded to Moultrie County Historical Society. If you have any other information, please contact the Moultrie County Historical Society at 217-728- 4085.

A Floating Adventure Less than a Barrel of Laughs

Oh Brother...

•July 27, 2016•

By Mike Brothers
NP Managing Editor

Growing up in the Saline River valley, summer rains were a time of great joy in a world of little or no air conditioning.

As kids we didn’t realize the consequence of the rains ability to flood the streets of Harrisburg.

Sure, we had heard our parents and grandparents talk about the great flood of 1937. The Saline River overflowed into Harrisburg, sparing only the few elevated blocks of the square.

The only passage around town was by boat, and Hart’s Department Store led the nation in rubber boot sales.

It was a flood made particularly difficult by arriving in February so several lives were claimed by the cold winter waters.

By the 1950s a levee protected the city, and flooding levels were better controlled, but not so much that a bunch of kids couldn’t find a way to have fun in the low lands.

That’s what Mike Duncan and I thought when we saw some 55 gallon drums floating in a low lying area behind Smith Packing Company in Dorrisville one rainy afternoon.

We had some knowledge of Huckleberry Finn and his float trip down the Mississippi so we started trying to round up the barrels for our own trip. Read More

Pokemon Go Keeps Going in County

Photo by Kennedy Nolen All it takes is a smart phone, a free app, and a desire to solve the mysteries of Pokemon Go.

Photo by Kennedy Nolen
All it takes is a smart phone, a free app, and a desire to solve the mysteries of Pokemon Go.

•July 27, 2016•

By Kennedy Nolen
For the News Progress

It’s like an invasion. As the sun sets in Sullivan the young people come on to the streets armed with smart phones as Pokemon Go takes them to stops all over town.

Pokémon Go, a game/application by Niantic, has taken the world by storm since its July 6 release. This free application merges the Pokémon world with reality and gives players an opportunity to relive their childhood.

The game uses players’ smart phone GPS locations and maps to track their current location. Based on the location, a range of 250 Pokémon will appear along with the level of its power.

After catching a certain amount of Pokémon, players will eventually run out of Pokéballs which they will need to restock. This may be done via buying them with coins purchased with actual money, by earning them at battling in gyms, or by visiting special monuments known as ‘Pokéstops’. Read More

Griffey Jr. and Piazza Officially Hall of Famers

Cubs Snag Chapman from the Bronx

•July 27, 2016•

Kirk Whitaker
NP Sports Columnist

This week in sports was highlighted by the induction of longtime outfielder Ken Griffey Jr. and catcher Mike Piazza into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Griffey, the first overall pick in the 1987 MLB draft at the ripe young age of 18, led the American League in home runs from 1993 to ’99 maxing out at 56 bombs in ‘97 and ‘98 consecutively, part of 630 dingers over a 21 year career. “Junior” compiled a .284 batting average to boot, proving himself not just a power threat.

Griffey, said by some sports writers to have the sweetest swing in MLB history, was a part of the controversial home run renaissance after the strike that cost baseball its only World Series but was never connected to performance enhancement use as several others of his era.

Also of note, Junior received the highest vote total to enter Cooperstown to date, receiving 99.32% of votes in his first year on the ballot. Read More